Bedroom Bondage Retrospective

Bondage Life 67
April 1997

Bondage Life 67 - Lorelei & Jon Woods - copyright Harmony Concepts/Close-Up ConceptsIn late 1996, I decided to write a video script that would make good use of the train tracks near my apartment.  The resulting photos became famous on the internet -- in some ways the peak career moment for Jon and me.

Bondage Life 67 - Lorelei & Jon Woods - copyright Harmony Concepts/Close-Up ConceptsAs described in the magazine:

"I lived by these tracks for several years.  I thought about it many times, driving past them on my way to work: all a determined damsel needs is a willing villain.  When I at last found one, I was eager to plan the adventure.
   "In the costume store I asked for an old-fashioned blue dress.  The shop-owner brought out an outfit she called Sun-Bonnet Sue.  In the dressing room I looked in the mirror and visualized ropes pressing into the folds of fabric.
   "Every damsel needs not only a villain, but also her heroes.  I called up my bondage buddies Oak, Paul and Aaron, and asked if they'd protect me during this escapade.  They agreed to be there with cameras in hand.
   "I donned my dress and petticoats, and drove to the railroad tracks.  Villainous Leonard looked quite imposing in his top hat and cape... as he unloaded the tripods from my car. The five of us walked together up the rails, to the precise spot I'd picked out beforehand.  We piled coils of rough rope on the ground.  My heroes stood at the ready.  I gave the script a final run-through as Leonard waited, his black cape billowing in the wind.  It was now time to act out my fantasy, and it would all happen upon my signal.
   "I gave the word.  'Roll cameras... and... Action!'
   "Within the next few amazing minutes, I was thoroughly trussed, gagged, and placed struggling on the tracks.  Right where I'd always wanted to be."

"I think most of us were deeply affected by images presented to us by popular culture.  If we see them at that crucial moment in our development, they become indelibly imprinted into our psyches. One of the joys of playing bondage is being able to act out these fantasies in a safe, sane and consensual manner.  And if you ever have a chance to perform a fantasy -- no matter how juvenile or corny it may seem -- don't miss the opportunity.  You'll be surprised at how much fun it is."

Jon Woods
Bondage Life 67, page 3

The resulting video, "Damsels in Distress" (Close-Up video KISS-32) became one of my favorite productions for several reasons... It had a bondage-orgasm scene.  It had both of my life partners in it (Eric dons a gorilla suit to tie me up; Jon's the villain in hat and cape).  And best of all, it had two train-track bondages.

After the video came out, I took my favorite photo from that day and had it printed up as an 8x10 glossy.  My boss, Big John at Close-Up, saw the print and decided to frame it and hang it on the wall in his office.  The next time R. Q. Harmon came visiting, he spotted the photo and suggested to Big John that the pic could be a cover for Harmony Concepts' Bondage Life magazine.  Close-Up passed the photos along to Harmony for that purpose.

The magazine identifies me as "Kristine Imboch" - that was my bondage alias before I decided to start going by my real name Lorelei.  Jon is identified as "Leonard Ayresteel" because back then, there was something of a tradition for the Harmony guys to use two names -- usually something silly for their onscreen persona.  Photographer Eric Holman called himself Horton Fenwick onscreen, Brian Tarsis called himself Newton Pendergast, and Jon Woods was Leonard Ayresteel.

Bondage Life 67 is sadly out of print.

Click the individual frames below to see details:

Harmony Concepts website - Close-Up Concepts website

 

 

These photos are reposted with written permission for this specific appearance on this website.  I had to work from copies; sorry about the condition.  Apart from Harmony and Close-Up, other websites which previously scanned and posted these photos were not authorized to reprint the photoset.  (Reproducing an entire photoset without expressed permission does not constitute "Fair Use".)